Brooks Jensen Arts

$25 "Popular Editions" Prints

I believe artwork (particularly photography) should be affordable to everyone. Here you will find a special group of $25 prints I call Popular Editions. Here is the philosophical foundation of my uncommon pricing strategy for these selected prints. From time to time, I add or retire images from this special collection. If you'd like to know when changes are made, sign up for email announcement at the LensWork site here.

Popular Editions are printed pigment-on-paper, exactly like my other artwork. Popular Editions prints are approximately 8x10", usually printed on 9x13" Moab Entrada Bright 190gms/m2 archival matte surface paper — exceptions are noted. The prints are signed and numbered in an open edition. Here is a look at a sample full sheet as they are printed. They are shipped in an archival crystal clear sleeve with archival backing board, packaged flat for shipping in appropriate shipping cartons.

Click on the thumbnails for a larger image and print details.

Crows and Winter Tree, 2013

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The skeletal complexity of winter trees is one of their primary characteristics — one that I could stare at for hours on end. One that I have stared at for hours on end. Tendrils, veins, pathways, neurons, delta patterns, roots. Not one single straight line anywhere.

Printed on Harman Glossy Baryta

Palms, near Hilo, Hawaii, 2012

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A long day of photographing, tired and driving back to the hotel. Suddenly, a deep canyon under the bridge and palms — glowing, alive, magnificent palms! Amazing how refreshing and energized one can feel — even at the end of a long day — when presented with such a wonderful display of living energy.

Rock Wall and Tree Shadow, Capitol Reef, Utah, 2012
(from Light,
Glorious Light
)

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Standing in the canyons of Capitol Reef in southern Utah, the Sun passed overhead in that long arc of late summer. In the stillness of the moment, I watched the face of rock change from shadow to light, and in the process reveal surfaces in sensual detail. I felt the cosmic dance — the spinning Earth in orbit around Sun, the arrival of energy that began its 93 million mile journey just minutes before the encounter — and could not help but feel I was witnessing a miracle in each moment.

Storm Clouds, Capitol Reef, Utah, 2013

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When clouds like these loom up over a grand and glorious landscape, the scale and magnitude of the earth seems overwhelming — and I feel humbled in its presence.

Factory Butte, July 4th, 2013

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There is a famous (well, at least in photographic circles) image of Factory Butte by photographer William Clift. I've always admired it. Visiting Factory Butte for the first time, I could easily understand why he was motivated to photograph it.

Dry Wash, Factory Butte, 2013

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After visiting Factory Butte in July of the this same year, I returned in the fall to spend more time there. The surrounding landscape became more and more interesting as I started to connect with that desert environment.

Lone Tree, Sunset Crater Volcano, Arizona, 2013

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Black cinder cones that look like dark sand dunes. And way out there, one lone tree. I'm not sure if this image is a metaphor or not, but it resonates with me very strongly.

Rock Wall, Capitol Reef, Utah, 2012
(from Light,
Glorious Light
)

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Another image from the project Light, Glorious Light that was published in LensWork #106.

The Choir Herald, Alkabo School, ND, 2004

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1913. Published Monthly Each Containing 4 or More  Good Anthems by Well Known Composers. Accurately as advertised, "The All-round Songbook."

I found boxes of these in the Alkabo Schoolhouse, a bit worn for wear, but ready for immediate use should the demand arise.

Piano, Alkabo, ND, 1994

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This image is from the now abandoned Alkabo School in Alkabo, North Dakota. My wife's Uncle Kenny and his children went to school there. It closed in the late 1960s. There are three rooms. The gym is in the basement. I was fascinated by the silence of this old piano and couldn't help wondering how long it had sat still, quiet and how many hands had graced its keys.

Chairs and Pledge, Alkabo School, ND, 1994

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This is also from the Alkabo School. I am not hesitant about arranging found objects to make a better photograph, but in this image, everything is exactly as I found it. I could almost hear the little voices of the children from a long time ago.

War Eagle Cheroots, John Day, OR 1987

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This is from the Doc Hay Museum in John Day, Oregon. In the 19th Century, a large number of Chinese laborers were used in the mining operations in the West. Doc Hay was a native Chinese herbalist and physician to cared for them. His office, now preserved in this historic treasure, if a wonderful and detailed glimpse into the past.

Chairs & Curtain

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During an intense three day workshop with photographer David Bayles, he kept asking difficult questions about my work that I could not answer. When I stood up at the end of the session, I was struck by the glow of the chairs against the delicate curtain.

Piano workings #1, Alkabo School, North Dakota

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Back in the Alkabo School again, this time in 2003. I had previously photographed this piano as a piano. Opening the casing, I found inside evidence of craftsmanship and care that was simply beautiful.

Hand-made Saws, Tono, Japan, 1991

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In the small village of Tono in deep rural Japan, this blacksmith specialized in hand-made saws. This image is of a box of new saws for sale in the blacksmith's shop window.

Piano workings #2, Alkabo School, North Dakota

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This detail of the inside of the piano at the Alkabo School literally send shivers down my spine when I saw the handwritten, pencil signature of the piano craftsman who built this instrument.

Piano workings #3, Alkabo School, North Dakota

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There is an order and precision to this old piano that is somehow mechanically reassuring. These parts are not intended to be seen. Then what reason could they have for the gold-painted interior other than pride?

Coat Sleeve, Pioneer Shack, North Dakota, 2003

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Artists cannot deny the influence of other artists – and why should they? One of my favorite photographers is Wright Morris. When I saw this coat sleeve I thought of his work. I don't know if he ever photographed a coat sleeve, but it still makes me think of him.

Door and Latch, Paisley, OR, 1990

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Doors and windows are among the most prevalent themes in all of photography. The obvious symbolism makes them easy targets and effective seducers. When light plays on a door, I defy any photographer to resist.

Door, Pioneer Village, Crosby, ND, 2003

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I was captivated by the contrast of the rough-cut wood, the almost-disappeared paint, and the still shining brass knob and plate.

Door and Stick Latch,
Service Creek, OR, 1995

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In some communities, the only security that is required is a stick in a catch.

Grenora Post Office,
North Dakota, 2003

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Grenora is a town that survives, in spite of the exodus to the big cities. The post office is across the street from the one cafe. The breakfast is great and I recommend it if you ever find yourself there.

Window and Curtain,
St. Paul, OR, 1997

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Ever since Paul Strand photographed for his classic book Time in New England photographers have been making pictures of white walls and windows. They are seductive subjects both because of their quiet simplicity and their deceptively difficult white tones. White-on-white can so easily become photographic grey-and-blah. This is the only white wall I have ever photographed that I feel created the perfect white tones. Somehow, it makes me want to be a more moral person.

Three Chairs, Walnut Creek, TX, 1991

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I stopped to get gas at the Texaco Station in Walnut Springs, Texas. I stayed two days, photographing and chewing the fat with the local folks. Their hospitality was a thing to enjoy slowly and to relish even now as a memory.

Fallen Log, Rain, Mt. Erie, Fidalgo Island, 2006

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Also available in the folio
Winter Trees I

I confess, I was out photographing simply to test my new Sony DSC-R1 camera — and saw this wonderful composition and delicate, misty light. Who cares about testing when there are photographs to be made?

Sunken Boat,
Hood Canal, WA, 1983

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I photographed this sunken boat on New Year's Day in 1983 — and have waited over 23 years to make this print. Shortly after I developed the film, my cat chewed the negative, badly damaging the surface and poking a couple of holes in the film. Thanks to Photoshop, I've now been able to repair the damage. I am sorry to say that the cat is long gone, but at least the image lives.

Cape Perpetua #32

From the
October Seas folio

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Sometimes the gods smile on us photographers.

The Dalles Mountain Road, Oregon, 2000

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Eastern Oregon can be a dreary and desolate landscape. It can also be a spectacular one – particularly when the sky comes alive with light and clouds.

Winter Trees #1, Mt Erie, Fidalgo Island, WA, 2003

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Also available in the folio
Winter Trees I

In the small image on the monitor, this image doesn't show the blowing, almost horizontal snow that is plainly visible in the larger print. It snowed for about half an hour, stopped, the sun came out, the wind shifted and by day's end I was in shirtsleeves.

Winter Trees #2, John Day River, OR, 1989

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Also available in the folio
Winter Trees I

Chaos and more chaos. That was my first impression. Then I stood there and looked more deeply. The organic order of the leafless branched began to become visible as I let my eye adapt to what was there. This is one of my all-time favorite photographs – probably because of this personal lesson.

Winter Trees #3, Clackamas River, OR, 1990

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Also available in the folio
Winter Trees I

There is a sense in this image that someone has place cotton puffs on all the winter tree branches for some unknown purpose. Of course it is just moss, but I have always felt the presence of fairies or leprechauns or something way up the Clackamas River. Silly, but it is so.

Abstract #3, Fort Worden, WA, 2004

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Abstracts are my most favorite kinds of images. They are strictly personal so I rarely show them. It is a rare gift when they are also personal to someone else. I can always tell when one connects. Their eyes light up.

Fort Worden, Battery Kinze, May 2005, Wall Abstract #20

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Fort Worden — a long-ago decommissioned World War I defensive battery on the western edge of Puget Sound — is now a state park. The park rangers paint the miles of concrete walls in the bunkers in order to cover the graffiti left there by inconsiderate tourists.

I find the paint splatters and shapes make the most fascinating abstracts. They are often reminiscent of Japanese calligraphy. The various colors of paint make transition into black and white a palette with almost unlimited possibilities.

These three images were photographed in late May 2005 and are part of a larger body of work that is still in progress. When completed, my work with the Fort Worden abstracts will likely number a couple of hundred images.

Abstract #1, Fort Worden, WA, 2004

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This splash of paint is the Park Service's attempt to cover the graffiti on the walls at Fort Worden State Park. I wonder what the hurried ranger would say if he or she knew what marvelous shapes they have created.

Abstract #2, Fort Worden, WA, 2004

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This shape so reminded me of Chinese calligraphy that I was tempted to try to identify the character. Who knows, maybe it is.

Leeks, Tsugaru Honto, Tohoku, Japan, 1990

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No tiny plot of land goes uncultivated in Japan. Leeks, daikon radishes, persimmons, seaweed, fish – all in order, tight and tidy rows – all being prepared for market or meals.